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This is the fifth post in our new series of home renovation articles.  We’ll discuss the pros, cons, hows, and whys of popular reno projects.  Today’s post considers deck additions.
Imagine yourself relaxing outside.  Do you picture a deck, a hammock, a chaise lounge?  Maybe all three?  A deck isn’t just a way to maximize space (and room for friends when you’re having summertime parties). It’s also a great way to add value to your house.
What It’s Take to Complete a Deck Addition?
At first glance, a deck is easy, especially if it’s the no-frills, no-railing, basic wood version.  After all, it’s just a box, right?  Wrong.  Even basic decks require a framework underneath, with supports and posts to hold everything in place.  Once you take a deck up a notch (or a storey or two) the planning increases exponentially.
Now let’s talk about the materials.  Do you want a plain, simple deck or an elaborate concoction of hardwoods and wrought iron railings?  Are you okay with staining and sealing your deck every year or two, or does care-free composite decking suit your style?  These are all vital decisions when you’re planning a deck.
How Much Will It Cost to Build a Deck Addition?
If you’re a handy sort of person with a moderate amount of carpentry skill, you can build a simple deck yourself for the cost of materials.  Pressure-treated wood, an economical if not a beautiful building option, can get you a no-frills deck for under a thousand dollars.  (Remember to budget in money for a building permit, since only the very smallest decks, as in porch-sized, are permitted to be built without one.)
Now, if you’re like most of our readers, you’re not exactly the DIY type.  In that case, the cost of your deck will depend on the materials chosen and the size and complexity of your design.
Why Should I Add a Deck to My House?
Just about any deck, when done to code, will add value to your home.  Not every exterior renovation has a big impact on the selling price of your house; while landscaping adds curb appeal and may move a house off the market quicker, it doesn’t really add value.  Decks do.  Most experts place the return on investment for a deck addition between 60 and 70 percent; some estimates go as high as 90 percent.
Even if you’re not selling your house any time soon, adding a deck is like investing in your well-being.  No matter if you envision peaceful evenings alone with a book and a cool drink or packed parties with the barbeque going to full capacity, a deck is the perfect place to enjoy your backyard.
Image:  Shutterstock/Artazum and Iriana Shiyan